The Last Thing He Needs (Audiobook)

The Last Thing He Needs - J.H. Knight

I wasn't sure what to expect from this one, but it was really good. I admit, if this had been from Bobby's POV, I probably would've had less patience with it and wondered more why he'd risk his job getting involved with a guy like Tommy. Not that I didn't still wonder that, but since this was from Tommy's POV (though it's in the third person) I didn't spend much time mulling over it. 

 

Tommy and Bobby have a great friendship and relationship, and I like that actual months - instead of merely weeks or even just days - pass before they get to the ILUs. Tommy's got a lot on his plate, and grew up in poverty with parents who were addicts. He's responsible for his seven younger brother and sisters, and sometimes that means taking shortcuts to make sure they have necessities like toilet paper and food. But he does have morals and he has lines that he won't cross, and he does his best to make sure his siblings are growing up in as safe an environment as he can provide for them. Bobby coming into his life requires Bobby to open up to someone else, and then rely on and trust him. 

 

I really liked Bobby and his mom Judy, and there was good time spent with the older siblings so I could actually tell them apart from each other. There were some dropped subplots that I expected to see more of but didn't, or at least get a line or two about in the epilogue but didn't. 

 

I do have deduct points for the ridiculous sex scene that takes place after one of the MCs has been pretty seriously injured. Please, authors, stop doing this! I would find it much more romantic if the uninjured MC takes care of the injured MC than if they just go at it like there aren't stitches and pulled muscles and slings to consider. I'm just saying.

 

The narrator for this one is Michael Stellman. He does an adequate job with the text and he's easy to listen to and follow along with. He does a good job emoting too. But, he didn't really differentiate between voices for the various characters enough and it was sometimes difficult to tell who was speaking. I probably would've enjoyed this more if I'd read it on my own.