Linda78

Theft of Swords

Theft of Swords - Michael J. Sullivan, Tim Gerard Reynolds

One of my friends described this series as fantasy-lite and boy is it ever. Hadrian and Royce are fun protags, but the stories are on the thin side. 

 

I didn't realize this volume has two different stories, so I was getting annoyed at how quickly the first story appeared to be resolving itself. But even after realizing what was going on, the writing and resolution of the first story is still too reliant on villain monologues. The story didn't take any unexpected twists and the characters don't have much depth. The second story was somewhat better in construction and the way it was paced. The fantasy elements are slow to be integrated, maybe to ease the reader into the world? Though I'm not sure why a fantasy fan would need such easing. (Ok, GRRM is on the feet-dragging side of this too, but his characters and their various relationships are complex and complicated, and the world they live in feels real. And even when the villains reveal things, you can't be sure they're telling the truth.)

 

The narrator has that fantasy-type voice which works well with the narration, but he doesn't have much range on the voices. A lot of the characters start sounding the same after awhile.

 

These are decent stories and fun, but I can't say I'm tempted to continue. I did pick up The Crown Tower during Audible's last sale, so I'll try that one next and see if some of these issues get improved upon or not. 

Midnight Riot (or, Rivers of London)

Midnight Riot - Ben Aaronovitch, Kobna Holdbrook-Smith

Oh, boy, that was fun! And funny! This is like the UK's answer to Harry Dresden - if Harry was way more mellow and his dog was a slipper with ears. Harry's dog might be named Mouse, but he ain't tiny. :) Toby still has it where it counts though.

 

Survey says: Harry kicks ass; Peter is swell bloke.

 

The world-building was pretty well-developed throughout the story, not just for the magic stuff but for London itself for us non-Londoners who don't know how London works. I imagine it's told in a politely backhanded enough way to still be amusing to those who live there though. We're told only what we need to know when we need to know it, and aren't info-dumped for no reason, yet it still manages to set things up for later books.

 

The case was interesting and certainly unexpected.

Punch and Judy is just messed up, y'all. And to think that was considered appropriate entertainment for the whole family back in the day.

(show spoiler)

Leslie looks like she's getting set up to be the Murphy of this universe, only much more mellow and less awesome. Though she could still end up being awesome later. We'll see. 

 

I'm not sure at all why the American publisher changed the name of the book from Rivers of London - since the rivers actually are pretty important - to Midnight Riot. Sure, there's a riot and it happens at night, but it's not even the climax of the book. Com'n. Did they really think we'd need the promise of a riot to get us interested? That's horrible. This isn't like trying to get kids interested in a bunch of old guys sitting around discussing the meaning of life to a bunch of rocks (BORING!) versus wizards doing cool magical stuff with stones (AWESOME!). There was just no reason to change the title, and maybe it's just me, but it also introduces an unfortunate (most likely completely unintentional) racial implication. Peter's mixed-race. There's a riot. Must be connected, yeah? Let's make it the title! Boo! Bad job, American publisher! Bad job! 

 

The narrator, Kobna Holdbrook-Smith, did an okay job. He has a nice voice, all silky and rich and mmmmm...wait, what was he saying? ;) I did tend to get caught up in the sound of his voice and miss the actual words he was saying, having to go back and re-listen and mmmmm... :D The downside is that he really needs to learn how to breathe properly when he's narrating. Lots of deep inhales at pretty much every stopping or pausing point. Comma? Time to breathe. End of sentence? Time to breathe. I did listen to the sample for the next book, and he seems to have improved on this point, so I'll continue with the audios.

DNF@ 11%

The Underground Railroad: A Novel - Colson Whitehead

I'm just not feeling this one. I've been struggling getting into it, but the disjointed sentence structure and lack of any connection to the characters doesn't help. And apparently Whitehead decided to make the Underground Railroad an actual railroad that exists underground. Um...what?

 

These reviews explain my feelings on this book pretty well:

 

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1709610537?book_show_action=true&from_review_page=1

 

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1696038487?book_show_action=true&from_review_page=1

 

Armed & Dangerous

Armed and Dangerous: Four Dangerous Ground Novellas, Volume 1 - Josh Lanyon, Adrian Bisson

I HAVE AN EPIC MOVIE VOICEOVER VOICE AND THIS IS HOW I'M GOING TO READ THIS STORY TO YOU: EPICALLY AND WITH EXAGGERATED PRO-NUN-CI-A-TION. BECAUSE THIS IS AN ACTION STORY AND THAT'S HOW IT SHOULD BE READ.

 

Yeah, I bailed halfway through the first chapter. I did try to skip a few chapters and see if it improved and it did not. Sorry, I just could not take it.

 

I love this series, but this narrator is awful.

Just Juliet

Just Juliet - Charlotte Reagan

This was just okay. It was all very...nice. And simple. And low angst. All problems were safely in the past. All new problems were easily surmounted and quickly put behind them.

 

The first third was promising. Lena finds out she's attracted to a girl, doesn't freak out, does some googling and instead of going GFY figures out she's bisexual. So that was good. The James's are a great, fun, close-knit family. Lena and Juliet's first date was pretty rad and adorable.

 

And then it just sort of meanders and keeps going way past the point it should have ended because there really wasn't much of a plot. It goes through all the tradition coming out tropes - telling the bestie, telling the family, telling the world - but there's no real emotion to anything. We're told what Lena's feeling, but I never felt it myself. Scott and Lakyn were...confusing. Scott is a well-rounded character and very mature and provides Lena with some good advice. Lakyn, who has been through some terrible times, is shy and a jerk and whenever he speaks, I kept seeing him as twelve instead of seventeen. But as a couple, other than being the cute gay couple, they didn't really add anything to the story.

 

The writing is technically pretty good, though dry, just a few stray typos and just one or two questionable word choices. There's a lot of telling in the later part of the book, versus showing. The characters are pretty one-note, and the way Lacey, the "token black kid," is introduced doesn't get improved upon as the story progresses. I know all these kids are, well, kids, but even my friends weren't throwing around this many sexist slurs when we were that age. Every single time any girl (usually Lacey) did anything questionable or assertive or not-nice, she's described as bitchy. Really? I don't know if the author is aware of the "black girls are more promiscuous" stereotype, but Lacey unfortunately inhabits that too. And the gay "jokes" were pretty terrible and also usually spoken by Lacey. Lacey just gets terrible treatment through most of the book. For a "gay friendly" book, there is a lot of low-key homophobia. 

 

This started promising but just became meh by the end and I had to force myself to finish.

Tipping the Velvet

Tipping the Velvet - Sarah Waters

This was well-written and well-narrated by Juanita McMahon, just like Fingersmith was, but it didn't quite grab me the way Fingersmith did. Nancy King and her plights and travails through London on her quest to find herself, love and acceptance are all just a little too over the top for me. And talk about your coinkydinks! The last chapter especially was loaded with them. Maybe Waters was doing a final curtain call thing, but it was a bit too much, ya know?

 

I do like Nan's tenacity to keep going and never get knocked down no matter what life threw at her, and it was an interesting journey through London in the late 1800s, when things were still very dangerous for LGBT people. I didn't always understand why Nan made some of the decisions she made. They at times felt kind of generic, like she needed to make x decision so the story could go to y plot line, and the story just kind of meandered at points. 

PsyCop Briefs - Audiobook

PsyCop Briefs: Volume 1 - Jordan Castillo Price, Gomez Pugh

This is a fun collection of short stories and novellas, ranging from before Among the Living to after Spook Squad. Most are older ones that I've read before, but there are a few new ones, including one from Lisa's POV. 

 

Gomez Pugh is perfect as Victor Bayne, and I can't imagine anyone else doing his voice. While he's improved on Jacob's voice, I'm still not 100% happy with it and probably never will be. I can usually go along with it without much issue, but the short story from Jacob's POV where Pugh is doing Jacob's voice through the whole thing was a tad painful to listen to.

Anansi Boys

Anansi Boys - Neil Gaiman, Lenny Henry

Well, this certainly has everything that makes a Neil Gaiman book a Neil Gaiman book. There are gods, weird things happening to apparently ordinary people, and interesting enough characters. But... It's my understanding that Gaiman actually wrote this book before American Gods, and it shows, and just from the way it reads, it has to be one of his earliest works. There's none of the lyrical prose that comes in the later stories, none of the quiet irony that gives flavor to his later worlds. Oh, there's still plenty of irony, it's just the kind that clubs you over the head to make sure you noticed it there. 

 

Not being African, or even African-American, I can't say if how these gods/legends were treated were accurate or not. Anansi is a trickster, that much is clear, but I'm not sure about the others. Since this is Gaiman, I have no doubt the man did his homework and approached this with nothing but love for the material. 

 

The one thing that really rubbed me the wrong way was Rosie. There's an unfortunate bit of non-con here. Since Spider is a trickster and is used to just mind-whammying people into doing or believing whatever he wants, the earlier stuff with him and Rosie was only to be expected. I guess of all it was really to be expected but I didn't like how

Spider mind-whammying Rosie into sleeping with him, when she was so set on remaining a virgin until her marriage to Charlie, was treated in the text. This is non-con, people. Yes, Rosie slaps him when she finds out and breaks up with him and Charlie as a result, but there wasn't the level of fury there I'd expected from her. Just one slap? And then she goes on immediately to tell her mother that she's in love with Spider (due to the mind-whammy, no doubt) and even later goes on to get back together with Spider. The non-con/rape is never brought up again, and while it's good that Spider stopped mind-whammying her, it was just never really addressed to my satisfaction.

(show spoiler)

 

So yeah...I can't really recommend this one on the strength of Gaiman's later works. It was entertaining enough, to a point, and certainly interesting - though I figured out the "twist" pretty early on and thought that was drawn out a little too long. Still, if you like fantasy, and particularly mythology that's not usually covered in most Western literature, then this is certainly worth a perusal. 

Alice in Wonderland

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll, John Tenniel

Yes I'm 38 years old and just now reading this book for the first time. I'm sure there are hundreds of books I didn't read as a kid that I probably should have. As for this one, it was very enjoyable. I probably would've loved it as a kid just for it being so strange and weird, but as an adult, I love most how ironic it is. The word play, the whacky hijinks, Alice's existential crisis, and just watching Alice try to figure out how to Escape the Room she first lands in was a lot of fun. I never saw the entirety of the Disney movie either, just bits and pieces. I've only seen the Johnny Depp movie, which is post-Alice in Wonderland, in full. Why I did that, I don't know. I must've been feeling in need of punishment for some transgression at the time. 

 

It was fun reading a classic like this, which I've absorbed a lot of through pop culture references, but have no real clue what to expect of the actual book. It was fun, easy to read, and certainly something that both children and adults can get something out of. 

SPOILER ALERT!

Embers

Embers (Common Law) - Kate Sherwood

And here's the unprofessional-professional, and here's where I check out of this series. 

 

*sigh*

 

I don't understand Jericho or what Sherwood is doing with his characterization. She wants me to believe this dude survived eight years in the Marines, four tours in Afghanistan (acquiring a Purple Heart, a Silver Star and a bachelor's degree all in that time), and went on to be a beat cop for the LAPD and eventually made detective. But here's the thing: Jericho's in idiot. He has no balls, no backbone, no brains; he's constantly being shoved around in one direction or another by everyone around him, not just his ubercrush Wade, and he does nothing about it except dig himself in deeper. Oh, but he has authority issues. If that's the case, how did he make it through boot camp? He survived four tours and eight years as a Marine but can't figure out how to get a gun out of someone's hand whose standing a mere three feet away from him? Really? He has authority issues but willingly lets himself be manipulated by Wade even after Wade says straight to his face that's what he's going to do? Jay needs to grow a pair and grow up.

 

At least Hockley shows some flexibility here and doesn't just keep up the "I'm a fed so I'm a jerkface for no other reason than I'm a fed" nonsense that he's had going on in the last book, but frankly, I'm getting close to being over the "locals vs the feds" nonsense that fiction writers just love to drool all over. There is at least an explanation of sorts in this one about why they're being such major tools. Kayla's tough and decisive where she can be, but really, by the time the feds are done with this town, I doubt she'll have anything resembling respect from her subordinates the way things are going right now.

 

As for the biker wars story - please. Just...that was the most convoluted plotline I've seen in awhile. And Nikki and her kids - honestly, I don't understand why Jericho gives a crap about any of them, when Nikki is constantly taking advantage of him and the kids are so horrible. Clearly, the only conclusion I can draw at this point is that he's a masochist. Which brings us to:

 

Wade Granger. Why am I supposed to give a crap about this dipshirt and Jericho's star-crossed obsession with him? If it really is star-crossed since Jericho's just barely pretending to act like a cop at this point. And is Jericho serious about his "if they made drugs legal then they wouldn't be a problem" logic? I guess he's a-OK with elementary school kids being used as mules and pushers, and teens getting hooked on this stuff and people OD-ing left and right and throwing their lives away for a high. But hey, if they're legal, then his ex-boyfriend would have a legitimate business enterprise and it'd be all good for them. Well, except the illegal weapons running and whatnot. Shoot, I guess we're just going to have to make that legal too. (And even if Wade ends up being revealed as being undercover (unlikely) or an informant (somewhat more likely) that still doesn't excuse Jericho's behavior up to this point.)

 

Writing is still good, but I have get off this stupid train.

DNF @ 38%

The Raven Boys (Raven Cycle, #1) - Maggie Stiefvater, Will Patton

It's not that the narrator is bad, per se, his voice just doesn't fit the story or characters very well. He sounds 60-something, and this is a book about teenagers, and he has that kind of smoky, gravely voice that I suppose would work good with, IDK, campfire stories but isn't quite up to snuff for this book.

 

Also, I'm kind of annoyed that Blue, the only prominent female protag, is limited to a plotline surrounding her relationship status, or lack thereof, while Gansey gets a whole quest story. And Blue's power is to enhance other people's powers so isn't even useful to herself, which means she's going to end up helping Gansey on his quest to find the ley lines and yadda yadda yadda.

 

Maybe I'll come back and try this later in ebook format, but it's not something I'm feeling compelled to finish now.

Charmed & Dangerous

Charmed and Dangerous: Ten Tales of Gay Paranormal Romance and Urban Fantasy - Andrea Speed, Rhys Ford, Charlie Cochet, K.J. Charles, Jordan L. Hawk, Lou Harper, Astrid Amara, Nicole Kimberling, Ginn Hale, Jordan Castillo Price

Dim Sum Asylum - Rhys Ford (no rating)

 

Um...WTF was this? I might have gotten more out of this one if I'd read Ford's Sinner's Gin series, but the premise for it didn't interest me. After reading this, I'm glad I stayed away. There was a lot of info dumping as everything is described to fill non-readers in on this world, and it eats up a lot of page time. The chase through the city for the sexed up monkey statue was kind of interesting but again was bogged down with too many descriptions and background about everything when you just want to be chasing the statue. Then there's the ridiculous instalove/sex with Roku and his brand new partner on the force who has kind of been stalking Roku and finangled his way into a partnership with Roku in a really creepy way that's only marginally addressed before the hormones get in the way. I'll be honest, it was clear the entire last chapter was just going to be them boinking and making goo-goo eyes at each other, so I skipped it. 

 

Swift and the Black Dog - Ginn Hale (4 stars)

 

Now this is more like it. This was well-written, with a damaged former "hero" of a revolution who hasn't dealt with the aftermath all too well. I was confused a lot of the time, but Hale gives just enough info to slowly fill in what this world is like and what it used to be like, and why Swift and his band of magician friends really went to war against the Tyrant. Making a better world wasn't exactly on their to-do list, let's just leave it at that. This didn't have a romance, per se, but a beginning of one and it was sweetly done. 

 

A Queer Trade - KJ Charles (4 stars)

 

Finally! A KJ Charles story that doesn't make me want to rip off the MC's nads. I hate alphaholes in romances with a passion, yet she always seems to include one, so even though I like her writing well enough, I've learned to avoid her stories. Thankfully, that was not the case here. Ned and Crispin are both adorable. Ned is self-assured and aware, and Crispin is awkward and well-meaning. When Crispin's mentor dies unexpectedly and his magical papers sold to a waste-man by his unsuspecting relatives, Crispin and Ned are thrown together trying to fix the blunder. And what a blunder it is! It's also rare to read an historical that includes a POC as an MC, and have it be well-done. There is attention paid to the racial differences and experiences without making the story entirely about it. Instead, we get two men who are lonely and misunderstood for their own reasons finding acceptance in each other.

 

Magically Delicious - Nicole Kimberling (3 stars)

 

Fairies again. Or, goblins in this case. With really terrible table manners. The mystery was on the obvious side and the solution left plotholes. Still, it was imaginative and the characters were interesting.

 

Everyone's Afraid of Clowns - Jordan Castillo-Price (5 stars)

 

Read as part of Psycop Briefs: Volume 1

 

Vic is remembering his first time sensing a ghostly spirit in his teens and Jacob decides they should go check out the place. I don't know what's scarier, the clown or the misogynists. No, ok, I lied. The misogynists are scarier.

 

The Thirteenth Hex - Jordan L Hawk (3 stars)

 

Review here: http://linda78.booklikes.com/post/1384099/the-13th-hex

 

The Soldati Prince - Charlie Cochet (no rating)

 

If you like shifters, predestined mates, and possible Stockholm Syndrome resulting in tru wuv, this is the story for you. It's not my cuppa though. I again skimmed over most of the last this-is-the-boinking chapter.

 

One Hex Too Many - Lou Harper (3.5 stars)

 

This was again about two brand new partners on the police force. There was some awkward worldbuilding here and there but nothing too distracting from the story - though I still don't get what is so "extramundane" about a paranormal police squad. I liked both MCs and getting to see them work together, and the mystery was interesting. Then Harper throws the MCs together at literally the last minute and, honestly, I would've preferred this just be about two guys becoming friends. This isn't even romance. It's just last-minute sex that came out of nowhere. At least she doesn't linger over it and drag it out, but that's the only good thing I can say about it.

 

Josh of the Damned vs The Bathroom of Doom - Andrea Speed (not rated)

 

This is another one where I might have gotten more out of it if I'd read the stories it was based around. But the sexy, sensitive vampire boyfriend trend spawned by Twilight (Edward was a douche!) is just so over. I hate this trend and avoid these stories with a passion. And you seriously expect me to believe the creatures of the night cross over a magical portal every night to eat terrible convenience store food? I guess parts of it were funny if you like that brand of whacky comedy. Also, how is Carey more lame as a vampire name than Collin? I did finish this one, since it was thankfully very short, but since this is just not my genre, I decided not to rate it. 

 

The Trouble with Hexes - Astrid Amara (5 stars)

 

This is a reunited/second chances story and the best of the bunch after JCP's. It's not too complicated for a short story, so there wasn't a lot of info-dumping that needed to be done, but it was still an intricate enough plot to keep the story moving forward. The whodunit was on the obvious side, but the main focus here was Vincent and Tim's relationship and how they mend those broken bridges between them. 

Long Shadows

Long Shadows (Common Law Book 1) - Kate Sherwood

After finishing this book this morning and thinking it over for most of the day, I'm going to give this 3 "I liked it but..." stars. I think my opinion of this book is going to depend on where exactly Ms. Sherwood takes this series and these characters from here, as there is a lot left unresolved, so it's difficult to judge it on its own merits.

 

The "mystery," such as it was, was written pretty decently and was wrapped up in this book, so unlike my original impression of this so-called serial (these books are really too  long to call this a serial) where I assumed it was going to be one mystery extended over all four books, but it's actually a different case in each book. Ok, I guess Eli's murder might be the over-arching mystery, but again, I'll have to see how the rest of this series unfolds. Considering how little Jericho seemed to care about that, I can't see it carrying the weight of a four-book series. 

 

This book is fast-paced and the action is pretty well-written, and it doesn't keep you waiting to find out who is behind everything. Or rather, it doesn't keep the characters waiting the entire book to figure it what you figured out in the second chapter.

 

The writing in the establishing chapters that set up the premise and gives you most of the background on Jericho and the town is a bit clunky and info-dump-y. There's this bizarre scene where he's pulled into an interrogation room for absolutely no plausible reason right after he gets into town. It was head-scratch inducing, and the DEA agents are unreasonably hostile. There's some good humor here though, since Jericho is something of a wiseass. 

 

I liked Jericho well enough despite his at-times confusing motives, and so far he hasn't crossed into unprofessional-professional territory with Wade, who was Jericho's teen love and now the town's main crook. Kayla seems nice and everything but we don't really get to see much of her. She's a tough sheriff but doesn't mind bending a few "minor" laws here and there. Wade is... well... a crook and it's questionable at this point just how cold-hearted or ruthless he is or isn't, though his criminal activity doesn't leave much wiggle room for me to form a good opinion of him. Nikki is a complicated character and I'm not sure what to make of her or her kids at this point either. 

Reading progress update: I've read 8%.

A Storm of Swords - George R.R. Martin

I am totally adopting the Queen of Thorns as my sassy book grandma.

 

Pressure Head

Pressure Head - J.L. Merrow

It took me awhile to get into this one because the snipping-at-each-other form of enemies to lovers is just not that entertaining to me. I also couldn't understand why Tom was allowing Phil to drag him along on his investigation, when he really shouldn't be giving him the time of day. Also, Tom has a day job he was constantly neglecting and Phil wasn't pay him. Though to his credit, Phil did make an attempt.

 

Here's the deal: Phil had bullied Tom back in high school, which resulted in an accident that permanently injured Tom and altered his life in significant ways. Even if that was 13 years ago, I just don't get the "fancying the guy who bullied you" trope, and Phil kind of quasi-stalking Tom didn't help. Nor do I get Tom just going along with Phil's demands for help before anything was really resolved between them. Thankfully, things do eventually get resolved and in satisfying enough ways to make me forgive the slow, awkward, weird start.

 

The mystery was well done and there was no obvious villain, though I do admit I wasn't paying as much attention to the details and clues as I usually do since I was getting hung up on trying to figure out Tom. Still, there were enough red herrings and everyone had possible motives, so it wasn't easy to pick any one character out as the whodunit. 

 

Gary and Darren were the standouts here. They're only side characters, but they steal the show every time they're on page, and they're a hoot and a half. Then there are Merlin and Arthur, Tom's cats, who are very catty and fluffy. :D And even though there were a lot of Britishisms, there was only one I couldn't figure out. The humor is very dry though, so might not be to everyone's taste.

 

 

Actually, that's a good way to sum up Tom and Phil, innit?

Crazy Like a Foxe

Crazy Like A Foxe (Skyler Foxe Mysteries Book 6) - Haley Walsh

Maybe I wasn't quite in the right mood for this one after all, or maybe Skyler was being too OTT and TSTL for my tolerance levels. Skyler's always been reckless but this is the first time I remember fearing for the future since, as a teacher, he's responsible for molding young minds. He really should not be responsible for teenagers. :P

 

Summer's coming to a close and Skyler's summer job at the local museum is coming to its end as well. Everything's hunky dory until valuable items start going missing. A mysterious death soon follows, and Skyler's on the case (and frankly, I thought it took him too long to cotton on to what was going on, at least in one respect). There's also Keith's old boyfriend back in town, and the ex is up to no good. On top of all that, Skyler's still trying to wrap his head around his parents getting back together, and his various trust issues with his father.

 

Actually those same trust issues could explain a lot about Skyler's behavior in general - why he's such a control freak and needs to know everything NOW instead of when people are ready to tell him, and why he always assumes the worst case scenarios. That doesn't explain the various members of the SFC going along with his harebrained antics, especially when it involves

breaking into a storage facility and busting their way into a storage locker. If I were Sydney, I'd let them all sit in the tank for a night instead of finding ways to get them off the hook all the time. That's not even mentioning hacking into Keith's phone, which is a far worse offense on a personal level.

(show spoiler)

But then they wouldn't be the SFC we know and love if they didn't 100% support Skyler. At least Phillip has some sense.

 

We don't spend as much time with the kids in this book as in previous ones, and there's a lot of focus on the football team when we do, due to Keith signing up a girl to play on the team, and not as a kicker. We also get to learn a bit more about Keith's background, which leads to some in depth discussions about where Skyler and Keith envision their relationship going.

 

Joel Leslie usually does a decent job on the various accents, but in this book we meet a female football player name Eleigh (sp?). The first time she spoke, based on the accent Leslie was using, I figured she'd be Australian. Nope. Turns out she's Samoan, and I don't think she grew up in Australia. That's just the complete wrong accent to use. I've lived around Samoans my whole life and never once heard any of them use any accent even close to Australian. Just...WTF was that? It was terrible and it grated more and more each time she spoke. Everyone else, he does well and Joel and Rodolfo have always been my standout favorite characters that he voices. They all continue to shine here. 

 

This was still funny and fun, and hopefully some of the growth we see in Skyler in this book will stick.

Currently reading

Georgia Peaches and Other Forbidden Fruit
Jaye Robin Brown
The Crown Tower: The Riyria Chronicles, Book 1
Michael J. Sullivan, Recorded Books LLC, Tim Gerard Reynolds
Wizard's Holiday
Diane Duane
A Storm of Swords
George R.R. Martin
Progress: 8 %